click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20131103
20131103
STATION
SFGTV2 13
CSPAN 6
SFGTV 6
CSPAN2 4
FBC 4
KGO (ABC) 3
CNNW 2
KPIX (CBS) 2
MSNBCW 2
KCSM (PBS) 1
MSNBC 1
WHUT (Howard University Television) 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
WTTG 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 54
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 54 (some duplicates have been removed)
there's a heavy weight lobbying campaign under way to push comprehensive immigration reform. it's week applied by the chamber of commerce is forward.u.s. among others. it's a group founded by facebook's mark zuker berg. >> house democrats introduced their reform. we'll talk with congressman jeff denham, the first republican to join with democrats as a bill respond sore. >> president obama spoke to a room full of advocates at the white house on thursday in hopes of bringing the senate's im grayings bill back into the -- immigration bill back into the spot light. >> it doesn't make sense to have 11 million people in this country illegally an incentive to come out of the shadows, get right with the law, meet their responsibilities and permit ahead. >> the border security you economic opportunity and immigration modernisation act passed in the senate in june 27th. it's in the hands of the house. it features border security, doubling border patrol with a boost in funding and mandatory use of force training. a pathway to citizenship, establishing a 13-year pathway to citizen ship and include
immigration system i hope i'll get a chance to be part of it. and we're looking forward to putting together a team and rolling out the historic reform of that system >> thank you for this conversation. >> thank you to our san francisco chamber of commerce and business forward and sf city for co- hosting this town hall. i'm eager to hear from the other companies about their stories of immigration. tell us your own stories. we're to start with you the ceo of illuminate. >> so my story is not any more special then the stories of what you've heard. you group in india. i gave a shout out and my family really believes in education and the empowerment through education. there is a certain resistlessness and get out of your comfort zone and explore other things. that's how i got here. the path is not easy it's taken 12 years to get a green card. it limits ones opportunity. first, it will take a long time before the h1 process will allow you to move before jobs and you can't start a business. it took me 9 months to start a business. i was so restless to start something so you take capable
a model of activity we should - i'm going to tell everybody that 1, 2, and 3 to support the immigration reform. we're going to have access or the chances of services like voices 1, 2, and 3 is going to be much lower. i want to see the business owners follow suit. by the way, my wife and daughter are here and my daughter has the march t-shirt >> thank you for the practical steps and again, we have folks that are tweeting or posting there's so many ways to engage and it's easy and effective. it also means meeting people. we'll be taking another small group of ceos from small business by also start ups. in washington d.c. they only hate you when your successful. then we're going to open it up to the audience. as - >> we work with people all over the united states. we have an intelligent to do that we're suppliers there and we get to them and explain the how and why and what to do. and that's another way to leverage our networks and our stories to be able to do that. and march for innovation that's a great thing it's allblast about how easy it is to do those things. i take every opportuni
. thousands of our members of our limited english and immigrant community, in fact, all our commensurate's live in fear of did he portion and they've mistrusted the system. so this is a message i want to send by the signing of this ordinance and i'm speaking to our immigrant communities that's it's safe absolutely save to call the police if you're a victim or witness to a crime. everyone knows we need to stand against s come we also retain some local flexibility to deal with violent felons and while we compromised on that aspect of it and understood how complicated that was that perhaps we had points of view on we never lost sight of getting rid of s came. so we do what i think other government's should do we found the common ground and that's why i'm proud to be signing this ordinance. i'd like to take p the opportunity to invite supervisor avalos what it's meant to him but basing also to the rest of the city. thank you, mr. mayor. and i want to thank you for your work on this legislation. we met in early august to discuss this item and i was very impressed with how much you thought a
immigration reform, which would increase the need for skilled labor that many people say is critical to their location decisions. so this is a very top priority of the president come as is making sure our training programs are more demand than, that we are working, you and community colleges, so if you want to locate here, there's someone who says if you are a little unsure whether there is a particular skill need that may not be met in a particular location, that we will work with you to make sure there is a training program that works for you. that is one area. the second area which the president has put out is to have a grand bargain on jobs where you would lower the corporate tax rate, have a lower corporate tax rate, and at the same time use some of the one-time funds to strengthen our infrastructure so that your supply chains can move more quickly. these are important components we have to do. the third one is that we have to give and we fight very hard on this a greater sense of stability. i guess you could say we want more manufacturing and less manufactured crises. we have n
of immigrants for the only thing they've done wrong is come here to work because we needed to come here to work so this is a major step. and in addition to all of that we also have legislation that actually stops extortion so an employer can in the morning say he is not going to pay you. all the things that occurred have done so in the past week. we're e we've still not gotten immigration reform across the united states but san francisco has it right (clapping) >> (speaking spanish.) >> this is did you process for all. >> (speaking spanish.) >> (clapping) >> (speaking spanish.) >> and the importance of all of this is because we're going to celebrate with young people and celebrate their accomplishments so young people can grew up in a society where they're not going to be fearful of being here and that's a reason for celebration today. i want to start with our first nominee is jonathan. jonathan where are you? yeah. let's give a round of applause (clapping) >> jonathan is a telephone grader at mission high school he's 80 a great student and good citizen. he has a gpa of 4.0. he's devot
francisco base we don't want grgs immigration to create fear so, now i announce you to everybody in our immigrant community it's absolutely save to confront with our police department you will not get picked up for cooperating (clapping) feinstein, finally after 20 years of struggle you're going to be provide of this because we kicked off this year we're going to have a mexican museum in san francisco. (clapping). that is incredible right in the heart of our your bay appoint a district. when you look at everything we're building community and putting faith in our kids and creating the companies for families that's the best investment i'll ever, ever see in the city it's not just foreign that investment from china or other countries the best investment anybody what make is start their families in san francisco. because when you start a family as i know you know you've told us which is important schools and safety and business and a small businesses and all the krordz you've already told you you would say. so keep on growing our families in san francisco. i'm glad to celebrate latino comm
lgbt women, immigrant women and native american women. what is that? who are these people? over 60% of the republicans voted against -- in the house voted against the violence against women act. this is about respect for who we are, for what our judgment is, what our responsibility is to use our free will. sizing and time of our families. decisions made within our families. not within the courts or the legislatures of some states. >> it struck me that part of the strategy, frankly, on the violence against women act was kind of shaming the republicans into this idea that we would put aside certain categories of women that wouldn't be covered. and i'm wondering, the senate is going to do its first test vote on enda. but the question is will it -- what will happen in the house? what do you think the prospects are in the house? >> let me just say on that subject, as with shutting down government as opening it up as with the immigration bill as with 95% of -- at least 95% of the democrats are on the legislation and will vote for the legislation. so we only need 10% of the republicans wi
for comprehensive immigration reform. in full disclosure, my mother immigrated here in 26 from mexico city. i have some very strong opinions about immigration. much of what i would love to talk to you about over coffee. but what we are saying that we as an education system we can't do our job that they have to go outside of the work force and i reject that and we need to reject that. and that's where we take on stem as a whole. so what is stem charge? now, this is a statement that is common within sfusd, it's a very powerful statement of overcoming the predictive nature of demographics. the person i used to work with in a former job is the president and director of the museum of science. his name is mullist. he used to be the dean of engineering school at rutgers. he said students that go ahead a degree in engineering also has a family in engineering. that's not surprising. engineering is one of the least understood terms or professions by young people s an engineer a person who drives the train. is an engineer when your toilet breaks in a hotel and you call down and they say they are going to se
, a history of immigrant. a history of people who come to this country seeking a better life and making it so. it isn't just those individuals who make the headlines or become elected officials, it's also those who toil for years who lived in the working class neighborhoods of san francisco who helped us because history will teach us this. filipino community helped us build the golden gate bridge and when we looking that it's not just the named engineers whether it's the rail yards or the bridges are simply built by names their built by the hands of immigrants to make the city successful. and because of that history and because it's reflected in so much of the city. when i look at selma south of market and the "x" sorrow arena and understand where the filipino people are living you'll see street names that reflect the filipino national heroes. peoplely often excuse me. what is this street name mean resolve who's that? or other names? there are those streets that reflect our history. and we have some special historic figures like victor who was a filipino oiven so we named a park after her.
-- for a more inclusive tone in the republican party. his book makes the case that immigration reform is vital to america's future, and also, it's the right thing to do. for governor bush, immigration isn't just a policy issue. it is part of his family's heritage, his wife of nearly 40 years, colombo, was born in mexico, and they are the proud parents of three children. his family is the new american family. the thing that really sets jeb bush apart is that he is a conservative that stands for something, not just against it. as jack kemp once said, our appeal of boundless opportunity crosses every barrier of geography, race, and belief. we may not get every vote, but we will speak to every heart. in word and action, we will represent our entire american family. each day, governor bush does just that. he looks ahead to what can be done to improve people's lives and preserve freedom, how we as a nation can grow our economy and strengthen our democracy, and how we can do it all by working together. that is a noble mission. it is one so deserving of recognition at any time, especially right now. t
officers and judges. for limited english speaking and immigrant survivors who are particularly victimized we have expanded those to immigrant community and two trained first responder in the vocabulary of domestic violence and 3 provide telephone interpretation and smart phone with translation software to police officers. we'll hear a little bit about that from our famous chief. we recognize the domestic violence survivors need many different options and some don't feel comfortable users our judicious system so we have a need not of community agencies again who are slnt here we partner with in servicing survivors and their families and children. we're assuring accountability for visitor by striking e strictly auditing the program. finally, there's we'll have about that noisy be noisy with me now and persistent and we'll end not only homicides but end-all domestic violence in our city. thank you for being here today (clapping) >> thank you very much vice president. we'll hear from our critical partner police chief greg (clapping) >> thank you dr. as many speakers have mentioned and i'm g
. >> congressman trey gowdy, member of the house oversight judiciary committees. he chairs the immigration and border security subcommittee. congressman, great to have you with us. let's start with, if we may, obama care. this president lied. his administration lied. and persisted over a period of more than three years in maintaining the fiction that people could keep their insurance plans if they chose. your reaction? >> well, i hate it for my fellow citizens, but there were lots of voices warning that what he was saying was just not going to be a true or a lie or mendacious or whatever synonym you want to use. and that's not the only mischaracterization. your premiums are going to be higher, and your coverage is going to be worse. you would think at a certain point, politics aside, that people would get tired to by being lied to by people in positions of power whether that's the president, the head of the nas, the attorney general, but we had an election a couple years ago, and the calls in part, he perpetrated this myth, he was re-elected. >> and speaking of myths being perpetrated and
the need for better immigration policies to help the industry, relying on immigrant workers for farm work. >> according to the labor department, the u.s. had 1.4 million crop workers between 2006 and 2009. 26% were migrant workers. >> we have farmers going out of business because they can't get the labour. >> for viewers that say we have upward of 10 million people can't they be the workers. >> that's the easiest method to defunct. you go out and advertise. you may have three americans showing up. >> why is that, men's don't like the hard work? >> go into the water melon fields, can'ta lop - you and i wouldn't last. the heat and the work and the physical labour is unbelievable. our foundation did a study and fund anyone in arizona can earn as much money from the state and federal government being unemployed as they can in the field. >> buffet worries about americans who seem to be disconnected from their food roots. in rural towns. he uses tower hill, 12 minutes from his farm. >> those people have no way to get agz to what we call the basics foods, including fruit and vegetables. can they
people in our community, immigrants and people suffering from a variety of behavioral challenges and suffering from serious challenges and in need of help. next we found fiscal track and non-compliances. the audits are valuable. we are aware the corrective action process are in place an we understand the implementation correction maybe difficult to ask. so why did we do an investigation and write the report you have in your hands? as we report, we wonder what is the long-term impact of $500 million in funding and is there a process in place to measure the impact of individual programs against citywide social services objectives. providing meals to seniors as a human service agency is contracted is good. providing homes to avoid homelessness is good, providing counseling to individuals who do not speak english or who are challenged by the immigration system as is done by grants on the mayor's office on housing is good, assist for mental health care for needs of services as the department of public health programs is good, however while all the above service examples are good. do a
(clapping) working on projects if a that immigrant workers she's traveled to go africa thank you so much for your contributions (clapping) >> yeah. >> so once again, we want to thank all our letters throughout their lives and people hope they continue to be the leader for california and the rest of the nation. >> (clapping) >> (speaking spanish.) >> so we would like to thank supervisor avalos and all the participants. please feel free to take a seat. we're going to go ahead and conclude the reception is following but wild to emphasize we appreciate here in the city and county of san francisco all the latinos that are out there working day in and out. i want to honor the folks who have clean up the places that workday in and out to sustain the city silently at times but we have roots here in this state. we fray many, many generations and keep building strong community and encourage our young people to get their potential and to definitely definitely pass the word we must not ends our lives with violence with education and prospering in our economies in this state >> check her out y
it all. so when you need to survive here our cars by meets the desperate immigrants some of whom now feel they should never have left their home countries the eye. i know. this is how he got dizzy. they all keep quiet on the back cover which is the full well that if we could have taken place without the full sample and the dickens and work with activites the opinion that this movie is about the plight of a dickens come up with their own initiative to replace one big thing that got this odd use of out and replace them by now but that date which is a staunch ally upset with the date yet that is to protect its own backyard garden. let's all forget the bim spring is a cross his mind and in international politics. it is the mind and in which she helped put the genie back in the all too because the people on the ground in those countries for toppling age if there is an option to swing towards the chipmunks the state but we really think that ccs is going to the idea for the common authoritarian without the people rising up again the new. the road. come back you're thirty or live from moscow. mor
the things we need to do here. our because risk is getting our fiscal house in order, getting immigration reform done, and getting these things on trade through our congress, starting with trade promotion authority, which every president has had since 1974. but tpp, t-tip, to make sure we are at the center of this network of agreements, together with our legal system, our education system, our access to energy, could make this a platform that every country around the world wants to be in. that is a great potential for the united states economy and for job creation and growth at home. >> with that. thank you so much. [applause] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] a i never expected to write book on cancer until i was diagnosed at a relatively young age, 36. i was astonished at how different was going through treatment than what i had heard about cancer, what i had asked be, and i sort of expected it, i expected it to , wereell-oiled machine care obviously was not guaranteed, but people knew about my particular can
environment he don't know how many immigrants he's got working at emphasis place and other people raise a piece of paper and he's never been homeless i have been. i ask youenter to have a heart and compassion. i worked here when someone in westbrook gave me a chance. person helped me. i was homeless for 20 years a drug addict. then i listen to those people talk about move it to a different location. i ask that you united council mother brown and sit down and look at it what we do. we've got love people who have fallen off and gotten back up. hold our heads down each day. i ask the board just give us a chance on the biggest thing. let us show you guys we're productive >> thank you. next speaker, please. >> hi, my name is larry williams. politics, i don't know which about but i know we need those beds in bayview. we just need the beds. thank you >> thank you. next speaker, please. >> well, i get to speak on his time? i'm here to support the beds for bayview. i've seen in my line of work how those simple extensions of offering a person a place to sleep can change the dynamics of that
-- a lot of our patients are actually immigrants who have a lot of competing priorities, family issues, child care issues, maybe not being able to find work or finding work and not being insured and health care sometimes isn't the top priority for them. we need to understand that so that we can help them take care of themselves physically and emotionally to deal with all these other things. they also have to be working through with people living longer and living with more chronic conditions i think we're going to see more patients coming through. >> starting next year, every day 10,000 people will hit the age of 60 until 2020. . >> the needs of the patients that we see at kerr senior center often have to do with the consequences of long standing substance abuse and mental illness, linked to their chronic diseases. heart failure, hypertension, diabetes, cancer, stroke, those kinds of chronic illnesses. when you get them in your 30's and 40's and you have them into your aging process, you are not going to have a comfortable old age. you are also seeing in terms of epidemics, an increase
comprehensive immigration reform. it's week applied by the chamber of commerce is forward.u.s. among others. it's a group founded by
throughout the city, which is often called the paris of south america. >> this alley celebrates the immigrant past of buenos aires, beyond the postcard shops there are remnants of the 1880s dock side tenement world. >> a melting pot of immigrants from italy and spain, along with former slaves from africa. >> they didn't know, they didn't speak nothing, just they met there, you know, to drink or make parties and they create this kind of dancing inbetween. >> julio is a tango star and a popular dance instructor. >> he says much like jazz in new orleans, early tango was popular in the city's red-light district. >> young thrill seekers knocked to local dance hauls, called milangas where a scandalous staff was all the rage. >> these kind of people came to see this kind of, you know, this kind of milanga. >> it was forbidden. >> yes! >> in the early twenties, 20th century tango found its way to paris where it became a massive hit. >> soon, hollywood was also swarming, who could resist the passionate moves of rudolph valentino? >> it was tango's golden age, now celebrated at argentina's national tan
of the house oversight judiciary committees. he chairs the immigration and border security subcommittee. congressman, great to have you with us. let's start with, if we may, obama care. this president lied. his administration lied. and persisted over a period of more than three years in maintaining the fiction that people could keep their insurance plans if they chose. your reaction? >> well, i hate it for my fellow citizens, but there were lots of voices warning that what he was saying was just not going to be a true or a lie or mendacious or whatever synonym you want to use. and that's not the only mischaracterization. your premiums are going to be higher, and your coverage is going to be worse. you would think at a certain point, politics aside, that people would get tired to by being lied to by peop in positions of power whether that's the president, the head of the nas, the attorney general, but we had an election a couple years ago, and the calls in part, he perpetrated this myth, he was re-elected. >> and speaking of myths being perpetrated and this administration responding in p
is often called the paris of south america. >> this alley celebrates the immigrant past of buenos aires, beyond the postcard shops there are remnants of the 1880s dock side tenement world. >> a melting pot of immigrants from italy and spain, along with former slaves from africa. >> they didn't know, they didn't speak nothing, just they met there, you know, to drink or make parties and they create this kind of dancing inbetween. >> julio is a tango star and a popular dance instructor. >> he says much like jazz in new orleans, early tango was popular in the city's red-light district. >> young thrill seekers knocked to local dance hauls, called milangas where a scandalous staff was all the rage. >> these kind of people came to see this kind of, you know, this kind of milanga. >> it was forbidden. >> yes! >> in the early twenties, 20th century tango found its way to paris where it became a massive hit. >> soon, hollywood was also swarming, who could resist the passionate moves of rudolph valentino? >> it was tango's golden age, now celebrated at argentina's national tango museum, where anti
. and another $29 million to illegal immigrants. what the heck? when are we going to talk about entitlement reform? >> yes. nobody's a bear on that. >>> jonas? >> we just found out this week that dogs when they wag their tail to the right it means they are happy. the left, they're nervous. the more we learn about dogs that makes them happy, the more we'll spend on these little guys to make them happy. dcm up 20%. >> john, how can you be a bull? ramon, we love you! >>> the health care grinch about to steal christmas? it is enough to make holiday shoppers sick. the health care sticker price. after all, if you are doling out more for health care because of the new law, something tells me you do not dole out as much on those hickory farms holiday baskets i love next time you're at the mall. so stick a syringe in that tea plug. it looks like the ho-hum holiday might already be processed in. processed in. ok. >> i got it. i got it. >> this is like an introductory course. we
of families and children, seniors, immigrant community, and i think that we tend to be more classified as, you know, fiscally responsible, i would say. and, again, having my experience in working for the mayor's budget office, for example, prior to working for the board of supervisors, i think that gave me a really great background in terms of how the city works, how the city's budget is put together. and those really -- that experience has really influenced my decision-making process. >> and speaking of the city's budget, the city just enacted a two-year budget and it seems the city is always dealing with complicated issues including whether or not to raise taxes and fees. how will you approach these tough choices? >> i think that when we talk about raising fees or taxes, we always have to come at it from a very balanced approach. we have a lot of homeownerses, we have a lot of tenants in the city. and, so, again balance is really key. i think we also have to approach the budget and some tough fiscal issues looking at the city-wide budget as a whole and not just looking at specific sectors or
islam. in "zealot" aslan describes being a 15-year-old immigrant from iran and attending an evangelical youth camp in california where jesus was hailed as the savior. >> i immediately gave my life to jesus, had a deep encounter with christ. spent the next four or five years preaching the gospel as i had learned it from this very conservative evangelical community, preaching it to everyone, whether they wanted to hear it or not, frankly. >> but then, aslan says, studying religion at university disillusioned him and he left christianity. >> when i went to university and began studying the new testament in an academic environment and discovered immediately, as everyone who does so discovers, that far from being literal and inerrant, the scriptures are figurative and full of the most obvious and blatant errors and contradictions, that notion of evangelical christianity no longer made sense to me. >> aslan's book places jesus in a long line of nationalist and would-be messiahs who wanted to end roman oppression and establish the kingdom of god on earth. >> there were many zealots in jesus's
the border. and i'm working to deny state services to illegal immigrants. enough is enough. >> governor pete wilson. >> hard line immigration rhetoric. it is standard fare in republican primaries today. in 1994, this was something kind of new. in a way wilson and his fellow california republicans pioneered its modern use. 1994 was the year they put proposition 187 on the ballot, which sought to ban illegal immigrants and children from receiving state services including health care and public education. and it was political gold, proposition 187 passed, and pete wilson came from behind to win by double digits. it was also, for wilson and california republicans, the beginning of the end. california was a changing state, in the midst of a demographic overhaul. california of 1994 was barely one quarter latino, today that number is around 40%, back then fewer than 10% of the state was asian-american. today it is nearly 15%. 27% of the state's residents are foreign born. california is now one of the only states in america where whites do not make up a majority of the population. and for that risin
is undocumented immigrants. they don't have access to care and we take care of them for free and had a high level. you come to emergency room you are getting the most expensive care in our system. i wish doctors in the trenches like us were part of creating the legislation and i don't think that happened. >> doctor boon. >> they should have talked to doctors in congress and congressman tom price is my congressman and i am a fan of him and empowering patients first act had a lot of solutions. if i would say one thing i want. selling insurance cross state leans and open up all of the lines and get less costly insurance and they can compete. right now it is selling insurance in georgia and south carolina and everybody is competing and prices are getting better. >> let me ask you. yes or no. in five years, will obama care have made health care better or worse. >> i honestly don't know. i would say no change. >> doctor, dr. boon is the only one that read the bill. and based on what i know it will make it worse. one thing i want to preserve. i love my patients and be a doctor. you have to maintain the
and -- as the center of who we are as a nation. transforming education and economically driven immigration system and energy policy based on north american resources and american ingenuity and committed family life over start prosperity for many americans to what we had today. there is another important part of this. economic freedom in all of its forms will sustain prosperity over the long haul. no one understood that editor -- that better than jack. driving american supply-side economic and carrying -- tearing down the barriers in the capital leftm for those who are behind. those policies lead to exponential growth that we the leadership of ronald reagan. many people benefited from that .rowth than what we have today conservatives need to advance economic freedom for this of a vacation of the tax code and lower tax rates. these of the lost productivity, the lost jobs, misallocated capital from the convoluted tax code in the world. conservatives need to advance economic freedom through advocating a monetary policy that does not punish savers and job creating small businesses. our current policy
star in 2002. president of the santa ana school board, lawyer, daughter of an immigration attorney when she met the state attorney general at the time. >> we could talk for hours. policy things and he had great stories. >> reporter: they married, settled in hayward and had a son. after bill became state treasurer he transferred money into her accounts. she won the election and spent a month in rehab. >> i admitted myself. >> reporter: that's where she met a san jose construction worker dealing with a methamphetamine addiction. >> i thought he was a genuine person when i first met him and made the stupid mistake of believing i had to save him. >> reporter: nadya won the election for the supervisor, the high point of her career. but on the personal front, arguments with her husband led to an affair and her own addiction to meth. >> when did you start using? >> i was an elected official and i was a mother and i was a wife. and i made that deshl, bad choice. i'm responsible for making it. >> reporter: steve refused to be interviewed for the story and e-mailed me i have been completely clean
of what happens on the so-called immigration. in the meantime, she's knocking back sizable speaker fees from wall street. not exactly a favorite location or address from democratic party. she received $1 million from goldman sachs for a pair of speeches. >> that takes away some moral authority. talking about mainstream and wall street hurting, middle-class voters. >> i think she's doing what politicians often do, and that is they go on the speech they can circuit. her husband, bill clinton, commands huge numbers. he went to australia for a million bucks for one speech. >> who's it from? this is from goldman sachs. people taking advantage of the middle-class folks. >> unfortunately, you don't always -- you are not always able to get somebody to you like the australian government to finance your speech making activities. >> one of the questions out there, if not hillary clinton, if for whatever reason she decides not to run or something happens, who else do the democrats have? >> you got andrew cuomo. believe me, terry will be on the bench when he wins next week. you've got a whole collec
, and it is not his profile to do this kind of political grand standing. he was a member of the 8 on immigration. he refused to be part of the back-up choir for ted cruz on the government shutdown. along with john mccain pushed a member of his own party, george w. bush, very hard on guantanamo. you consider seen consistency when it comes to oversight issues and military abuses. i think what he is asking for is not that unreasonable. and he's been asking for this for over a year. give us access to the people who were there. who are the survivors. give oversight committees, the appropriate committees, access to these folks. they've been denied access and there's very little, senator and minority can do, frankly, to assert leverage and pressure. these type of holds is one of the tools that is available. maybe the only tool that is actually available. >> so lz, why shouldn't everyone who was in the benghazi attacks be allowed to testify? what is wrong with lindsay graham's argument? >> okay, first of all, let's be clear. there is no politician, regardless of party, that is immune it using these opportun
the long-term immigration trend. whether americans will someday miss mexicans. so in that sense, for the government to change the narrative, we should try to report other aspects of mexico. but it shouldn't mean one or the other. i don't see how you can change the storyline that 100,000 people died or disappeared in mexico. that's still a very, very important story we must never forget. it's been trying to balance the two. rico's point is a great point. it's quite emblematic of the rest of the country. in some ways it is. if we look at juarez today, if we see juarez, places like laredo, if we see them as patients, is the patients in remission, her estate recovery in? i would say it is still in remission. i mean, a lot of the same factors there's no better, whether it's poverty, whether it's inequality. conviction rate is is still very low. i'm gratingly optimistic things will continue to get better. i do agree that community has also changed. civil society has. we see a much more, much more engaged civil society. people much more interested in trying to change their authorities
immigration. we have 3.1 people -- 3.1 million people come here every year. i think there is opportunity. i believe in hope and change. i believe in a better world. i don't speak for north dakota. the good people out here are probably the toughest men i have ever met in my life out here did -- out here. i see whole crews of women landscapers, men in the oil fields, there are mostly white and black eyes out here. the idea that you need illegal immigrants to work the business, or even the harvested -- i worked in the harvest and there were a lot of mexicans but a lot of white guys to. a lot of indians even. say, i the hard part to do not understand why democrats, women who have a child that is even if he has an education he's finished. i have been -- i am 49 and i have been through the ringer of reverse discrimination. i don't know how you vote against the interest of your race and people. we have to have a loyalty or your children are going to be finished. thank you for sharing your story. if you are just tuning in or joining us on c-span radio, which is heard nationwide, we have moved to xm
of serving it. >> obviously you'll expect them to explore immigration and issues around jobs. but i also think what's going to be interesting about what fusion does is the i think that's one of the places in which they can forge a unique identity which is by making sure that they're covering these stories from the millennial point of view, using the sources millennials use to get the information, making sure they're all over social media. those are going to be ways in which they connect with this audience. >> and mark, quickly, do you think that this is going to ultimately over time be trumped as a her mill een -- a more millennial outlet, or will it keep its latino flavor? >> i think the latino flavor will be part of it because latinos are such a big part of the millennial generation. moving forward, i expect that to continue. i think you'll see latino culture become a large part of medicaleni e millennial culture as they become a growing part of the population. >> the growing part of the population is becoming a subsection of the fastest growing part of the population, correct? >> corr
that are important, immigration, the environment, he takes a more moderate stance. it's a story, in a purple state, a tea party candidate is going to be at a disadvantage. >> and hurricane sandy, his ability, what he did, obviously, we're now having the new york city marathon this year. which we didn't have last year. because of how he handled hurricane sandy basically determined his election. >> christie said, i asked him about these issues, he said, you know what you guys all misunderstand about politics, it's not about ticking off boxes on this issue or that issue, he said that, at the end, it's a personal judgment about your leaders. politics is personal. we'll see. it was an interesting analysis about what a leader is. >> we'll have to do that. >> talk about virginia for a second, because, you know, if terry mcauliffe does wins, the republicans will be shut out of all the top offices in virginia. is this state completely transformed? >> it's astounding. we'll have the democrats if it goes the way we think controlling both senate seats the governor, the lieutenant governor and the attorney gen
have had two men killed. not only was haywood murdered but also a local citizen, a swedish immigrant had been wounded and they needed help from the professionals. well, st. paul and minneapolis have always been highly competitive in sports, business, and it turns out very competetive when it came to chasing outlaws. they were jealous. they did not want one force to get all the glory so they refused to work together. had they worked together there's a good chance the manhunt would end sooner but they would not. and they were good spinning their lies riding to the big woods of minnesota to the west and southwest of northfield. whenever they encountered a farmer or someone on the road they would say we're looking for horse thieves. we're the posse after the outlaws. and people accepted it. people were very innocent at that time. and they saw a bunch of guys with guns, oh, yeah, if you need a horse or -- can we borrow a sad until oh, yeah, here, go get this outlaws. so they were very good at fooling people as they were escaping through the minnesota woods. the other thing that assisted t
, worried about a tea party challenger and you ticked off a lot of conservatives with votes on immigration reform. this is your way to get back in their good graces. >> i've been a pro-life member of congress since day one. i was the author of a bill making it a crime attacking a woman and if she st. st. -- if she loses her baby you can be charged with two crimes, not one. this is a debate worthy of a democracy. what is the proper role of the government in protecting that child. >> senator graham, thank you. thank you for coming in today. always a pleasure to talk to you. >>> next up how serious are the problems with obamacare? our sunday panel assesses where we are one month into the troubled rollout. fifteen mi could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. mmmhmmm...everybody knows that. well, did you know that old macdonald was a really bad speller? your word is...cow. cow. cow. c...o...w... ...e...i...e...i...o. [buzzer] dangnabbit. geico. fifteen minutes could save you...well, you know. >> if you're getting one of these letters, just shop around in the new marketplace. that
in federal traction leading to the passage of reactionary sterilization and immigration laws. for the most part the dominant relationship between eugenics and contemporary genomics is that the former can be neatly circumscribed within a particular historical era, that of the. roughly between 1900-1930, and that any residual effects of its legacy can be attributed to a few individual scientists who continue to search for the biological inferiority of women, blacks and other minority groups, or even to no that expected parents who want quote unquote designer children. i depart from this ideal by casting eugenics as an early example of heredity capacity to shift public debate away from material and social inequities to the pathologies of particular bodies. during the progressive era, the scientific worldview of eugenics cast of biological science of salvation from the extreme poverty, civil unrest and overall exploitation associate with internationalization. the major consequences of the industrial revolution so the narrative with were really the product of unfit reading. a particular signifi
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 54 (some duplicates have been removed)